Reviews for Saving the World and Other Extreme Sports : A Maximum Ride Novel

Kirkus Reviews 2005 April #1
Nonstop action carries this page-turner breathlessly from start to finish. Fourteen-year-old Max (full name Maximum Ride) and her "flock" have escaped from a horrific School that kept them in cages and tortured them in the name of scientific research. Max and her flock are genetic experiments: 98% human with 2% avian genes grafted on, they're super-powerful-and can fly. "Erasers" (violent genetic combinations of men and wolves) pursue them at every turn. Crossing the country first to save their youngest from the School's scientific sadists and then track down their histories (were they born from parents or test tubes?), they wind up in New York City's sewers. Max develops shattering headaches and a Voice in her head that crashes nearby computers and tells her to save the world. Is it a friend or the flock's betrayer? Short chapters and paragraphs are smoothly accessible; Max's easy-to-read voice alternates between immediate and sardonic. The ending reveals frustratingly few answers, leaving layers of mystery for the sequel. Speed, suspense, excitement. (Science fiction. YA) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

Publishers Weekly Reviews 2006 July #4
Max, Fang, Iggy, Gasman, Nudge and Angel are being hunted by killers. No big deal because these kids can fly, literally. But how will this new threat to their safety affect their mission to save the world? Listeners will find out in School's Out Forever, James Patterson's second installment of the Maximum Ride series narrated with aplomb by Valentina de Angelis. (June). Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly Reviews 2005 July #2
Themes from Patterson's popular adult titles When the Wind Blows and The Lake House waft through this YA thriller, the author's first in the genre. Wood stars as Maximum Ride, 14-year-old leader of a band of kids who have escaped the lab where they were bred as 98% human and 2% bird (wings being a key component) and developed a variety of other-worldly talents. In Patterson's unusual universe, Max and her young cohorts are soon forced to rescue one of their own-a girl named Angel-from a pack of mutant wolf-humans called Erasers. Wood nails Patterson's often adult-beyond-their-years dialogue with a jaded tone. But the result of this pairing makes Max sound more off-putting than cool or intriguing. The listening experience is stalled in the starting gate, keeping the action-adventure earthbound rather than high-flying. Ages 12-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.