Reviews for Diary of a Wimpy Kid


Booklist Reviews 2007 April #1
The first year in the middle-school life of Greg Heffley is chronicled in this laugh-out-loud novel that first appeared on the Internet. Greg tells his story in a series of short, episodic chapters. Most revolve around the adolescent male curse: the need to do incredibly dumb things because they seem to be a good idea at the time. Yet, unlike some other books about kids of this age, there's no sense of a slightly condescending adult writer behind the main character. At every moment, Greg seems real, and the engrossed reader will even occasionally see the logic in some of his choices. Greatly adding to the humor are Kinney's cartoons, which appear on every page. The simple line drawings perfectly capture archetypes of growing up, such as a preschool-age little brother, out-of-touch teachers, and an assortment of class nerds. Lots of fun throughout. ((Reviewed April 1, 2007)) Copyright 2007 Booklist Reviews.

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Booklist Reviews 2014 December #1
School's out for the summer, but Greg Heffley's dreams of air conditioning and video games vanish in the first page of this latest installment in the iconic series. This time, Greg's overexcited mother shepherds Greg, his reluctant father, and his two brothers into an overstuffed minivan for the road trip to end all road trips. What starts as picture-perfect family fun soon turns into a comedy of errors involving, among other things, car trouble, rival road-trippers, and a pig. Long-suffering Greg has plenty of new material with this Choose Your Own Adventure style of vacation ("The problem is, I never seem to make the choices that get me to a happy ending"), and, as always, his angst will be easily relatable to his audience. Once again, the dry, deprecating tone of the text and the cartoonish illustrations will provide endless entertainment for newcomers and devoted series fans alike. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Demand for this best-selling series has only risen over the course of eight books, and with three movies out and a television special on the way, it shows no signs of letting up soon. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2007 Fall
"First of all, let me get something straight: This is a JOURNAL, not a diary." Greg Heffley chronicles a year of middle school through hilarious journal entries and accompanying cartoon sketches. His experiences--having to perform in a school play, dealing with bullies and changing friendships--are made fresh by Greg's over-the-top narration. Kinney's writing and illustrations are filled with laugh-out-loud kid humor. Copyright 2007 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring
"First of all, let me get something straight: This is a JOURNAL, not a diary." Greg Heffley chronicles a year of middle school through hilarious journal entries and accompanying cartoon sketches. His experiences--having to perform in a school play, dealing with bullies and changing friendships--are made fresh by Greg's over-the-top narration. Kinney's writing and illustrations are filled with laugh-out-loud kid humor. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2015 Fall
Greg and family embark on an epic road trip in this ninth installment. Mom has [Fri Feb 12 05:09:03 2016] enhancedContent.pl: Wide character in print at E:\websites\aquabrowser\IMCPL\app\site\enhancedContent.pl line 249. visions of an enriching, educational experience--and it's an experience, all right. There are sketchy motels, a baby pig, some trapped and freaked-out seagulls, and lots of family togetherness. "Greg's" crude drawings are a good match for his wry narration. Fans will want to go along for the ride.

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Kirkus Reviews 2007 March #1
First volume of a planned three, this edited version of an ongoing online serial records a middle-school everykid's triumphs and (more often) tribulations through the course of a school year. Largely through his own fault, mishaps seem to plague Greg at every turn, from the minor freak-outs of finding himself permanently seated in class between two pierced stoners and then being saddled with his mom for a substitute teacher, to being forced to wrestle in gym with a weird classmate who has invited him to view his "secret freckle." Presented in a mix of legible "hand-lettered" text and lots of simple cartoon illustrations with the punch lines often in dialogue balloons, Greg's escapades, unwavering self-interest and sardonic commentary are a hoot and a half--certain to elicit both gales of giggles and winces of sympathy (not to mention recognition) from young readers. (Fiction. 9-11) Copyright Kirkus 2007 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.

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Kirkus Reviews 2014 November #2
You'd think that if anyone would know better, it would be Greg Heffley's mother.But no. When she reads an article in Family Frolic magazine about wholesome family road trips, she insists on taking one right now. What ensues is the kind of totally over-the-top mayhem that the Wimpy Kid's fans have come to expect—and more. The family packs too much stuff to fit into the car, so they decide to tow Dad's utterly unseaworthy boat as extra cargo space. Mom insists on educational enrichment (learn-to-speak-Spanish CDs, lame-o car games), "real food" (brown-bag "Mommy Meals" instead of fast food) and "authentic" fun (a country fair with no rides but a guess-the-pig's-weight contest in which the prize is the pig; baby Manny wins). They spend the night in the absolute quintessence of a cruddy motel. Two slapstick driving sequences are both Hollywood-ready and extremely funny, especially in Kinney's accompanying cartoons; Greg's free-associative riff on humorless do-gooders who se ek to censor such potty-humor classics as a wink-and-a-nod-disguised Captain Underpants will find an appreciative audience. By taking the Heffleys on the road, Kinney both gives himself an almost universally familiar experience to lampoon and places Greg in the rather unusual position of being almost entirely justified in his misanthropy, which is downright refreshing. Every kid—and every parent—who's ever suffered through a family road trip will feel as one with Greg. (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus 2014 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2007 March #1

Kinney's popular Web comic, which began in 2004, makes its way to print as a laugh-out-loud "novel in cartoons," adapted from the series. Middle school student Greg Heffley takes readers through an academic year's worth of drama. Greg's mother forces him to keep a diary ("I know what it says on the cover, but when Mom went out to buy this thing I specifically told her to get one that didn't say 'diary' on it"), and in it he loosely recounts each day's events, interspersed with his comic illustrations. Kinney has a gift for believable preteen dialogue and narration (e.g., "Don't expect me to be all 'Dear Diary' this and 'Dear Diary' that"), and the illustrations serve as a hilarious counterpoint to Greg's often deadpan voice. The hero's utter obliviousness to his friends and family becomes a running joke. For instance, on Halloween, Greg and his best friend, Rowley, take refuge from some high school boys at Greg's grandmother's house; they taunt the bullies, who then T.P. her house. Greg's journal entry reads, "I do feel a little bad, because it looked like it was gonna take a long time to clean up. But on the bright side, Gramma is retired, so she probably didn't have anything planned for today anyway." Kinney ably skewers familiar aspects of junior high life, from dealing with the mysteries of what makes someone popular to the trauma of a "wrestling unit" in gym class. His print debut should keep readers in stitches, eagerly anticipating Greg's further adventures. Ages 8-13. (Apr.)

[Page 61]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2014 November #2

Could a Heffley family vacation ever be anything but a series of escalating tribulations that would test Job's resolve? In this ninth Diary of a Wimpy Kid outing, Kinney detours from the more episodic nature of the earlier books to trace the family's doomed-from-the-start road trip, spurred by Greg's mother's subscription to Family Frolic ("There must be something wrong with our family," Greg muses, "because we can never measure up to the ones in the magazine"). Kinney maintains his knack for getting the details of family life just right (naturally, the only available lounge chair at a wildly overcrowded waterpark is the one with several broken straps). But between the inadvertent acquisition of a pet pig, an attack by a flock of seagulls, Greg getting medical attention at the vet, and baby brother Manny managing to knock the parked family car into drive, there's more out-and-out absurdity in this installment than in previous books. Readers won't care, though, and their own family vacations will look downright blissful by comparison. Ages 8-12. Agent: Sylvie Rabineau, RWSG Literary Agency. (Nov.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

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Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

Could a Heffley family vacation ever be anything but a series of escalating tribulations that would test Job's resolve? In this ninth Diary of a Wimpy Kid outing, Kinney detours from the more episodic nature of the earlier books to trace the family's doomed-from-the-start road trip, spurred by Greg's mother's subscription to Family Frolic ("There must be something wrong with our family," Greg muses, "because we can never measure up to the ones in the magazine"). Kinney maintains his knack for getting the details of family life just right (naturally, the only available lounge chair at a wildly overcrowded waterpark is the one with several broken straps). But between the inadvertent acquisition of a pet pig, an attack by a flock of seagulls, Greg getting medical attention at the vet, and baby brother Manny managing to knock the parked family car into drive, there's more out-and-out absurdity in this installment than in previous books. Readers won't care, though, and their own family vacations will look downright blissful by comparison. Ages 8-12. Agent: Sylvie Rabineau, RWSG Literary Agency. (Nov.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2014 PWxyz LLC

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School Library Journal Reviews 2007 April

Gr 5-8-- Greg Heffley has actually been on the scene for more than two years. Created by an online game developer, he has starred in a Web book of the same name on www.funbrain.com since May 2004. This print version is just as engaging. Kinney does a masterful job of making the mundane life of boys on the brink of adolescence hilarious. Greg is a conflicted soul: he wants to do the right thing, but the constant quest for status and girls seems to undermine his every effort. His attempts to prove his worthiness in the popularity race (he estimates he's currently ranked 52nd or 53rd) are constantly foiled by well-meaning parents, a younger and older brother, and nerdy friends. While Greg is not the most principled protagonist, it is his very obliviousness to his faults that makes him such an appealing hero. Kinney's background as a cartoonist is apparent in this hybrid book that falls somewhere between traditional prose and graphic novel. It offers some of the same adventures as the Web book, but there are enough new subplots to entertain Funbrain followers. This version is more pared down, and the pace moves quickly. The first of three installments, it is an excellent choice for reluctant readers, but more experienced readers will also find much to enjoy and relate to in one seventh grader's view of the everyday trials and tribulations of middle school.--Kim Dare, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

[Page 140]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

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VOYA Reviews 2007 April
Even though Greg Heffley would rather play video games with his friend Rowley than write in the journal that his mother gives him, he uses it to record, in pictures and in text, the harrowing and clever ways in which he navigates the middle school social scene. Undersized and skinny, Greg has adventures that center on how he manages to separate himself from the geeks and how he evades bigger bullies by employing quick wit and harebrained ideas. Unfortunately Greg's schemes usually backfire, providing readers with the opportunity to delight in his distress. Picked on by an older brother, embarrassed by his baby brother, and closely monitored by his clever parents, Greg reacts in typical middle school fashion, making him a character with which many readers will be able to identify Kinney provides readers with a realistic view of middle school life as seen through the eyes of the entertaining but not very bright class clown. Readers can expect lots of middle school humor and exaggeration. Kinney manages to inject enough humor in the simple drawings to make them an integral element in the book. Because Kinney began his Wimpy Kid adventures on a Web site, many middle schoolers already familiar with the character will ensure a ready audience for this print version.-Chris Carlson 3Q 4P M Copyright 2007 Voya Reviews.

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