Reviews for Roses Are Pink, Your Feet Really Stink


Horn Book Guide Reviews 1996
On Valentine's Day, Gilbert gets even with a pair of troublesome classmates by writing mean-spirited messages on their cards. When he is ostracized, he makes amends by creating nicer cards in time for the Valentine's party. The light tone is matched by the amusing illustrations of Gilbert and his schoolmates, who are portrayed as anthropomorphized animals. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Kirkus Reviews 1995 November
0-688-13605-2 ~ The annual classroom exchange of valentines is the backdrop for this engaging story about retaliation. Gilbert remembers how hurt he felt when Lewis tweaked his nose and when Margaret made fun of his glasses. So when he's faced with 15 blank valentine cards, each one waiting for a poem, he decides to hurt them in return. ``Roses are red, you wet your bed. I think that you have rocks in your head,'' goes to Margaret (he signs it ``Lewis''), while Lewis's card carries the sentiments of the book's title (Gilbert signs that one ``Margaret''). Gilbert feels remorse, however, upon receiving pleasant valentines from both of them, and his regret is compounded when his deceit is discovered and he is shunned by the class. An apology and two new poems from Gilbert patch things up in time for the Valentine's Day party. These hazardous waters of handing out valentines are negotiated by a cast of animals whose emotional toils will closely mirror readers' own. DeGroat pens a sympathetic look at the small hurts in life and the importance of second chances. (Picture book. 5+) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1996 February #1
Following teacher's orders, Gilbert, a fuzzy-looking woodland creature, inscribes Valentines for his classmates, devising "nice" rhymes for each. But his bonhomie disappears when he comes to Lewis, who tweaked Gilbert's nose, and Margaret, who teased him about his glasses. As the clever, kid-obliging title attests, Gilbert does not make nice on their cards; to escape the consequences, he signs Margaret's name to Lewis's Valentine and vice versa. Of course, when neither receives a card signed with Gilbert's name, the identity of the prankster is clear. In a predictable resolution to this sweet if minor tale, Gilbert does the right thing and composes friendly Valentines to the two, who apologize for having hurt his feelings. The winning touch here is de Groat's (Annie Pitts, Swamp Monster) characteristically buoyant watercolor art, which features an amiable crew of assorted animals, many festively clad in Valentine's Day-appropriate reds and pinks. Ages 5-up. (Feb.) Copyright 1996 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1996 April
K-Gr 2 Gilbert writes not-so-nice Valentine poems for two rude classmates and signs their names to the cards. Since Margaret and Lewis both receive two Valentines from each other one good and one bad and none from Gilbert, his ploy is discovered and all the students ostracize him. The dilemma is resolved when all three apologize and Gilbert writes them new poems and shares his homemade cookies. Human foibles, humorously yet accurately revealed, are given practical, realistic, nondidactic solutions. DeGroat's delightful anthropomorphic critters are usually shown from readers' point of view, which draws them into the action. But occasionally the artist places Gilbert in a bird's-eye, omniscient view. Large, two-page watercolor spreads and a simple but smooth third-person narrative make this book a good choice for group sharing. Claudia Cooper, Ft. Stockton Independent School District, TX School Library Journal Reviews

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