Reviews for Attack of the Tagger


Booklist Reviews 2004 September #1
Gr. 3-5. Armed with a digital camera and ever-increasing confidence, Nolan, the nerdy fifth-grader who moonlights as a cyber-superhero (Shredderman [BKL F 15 04]), is back. This time a graffiti artist has struck in Cedar Valley, spraying buildings, playground equipment, and even the van of Nolan's teacher-cum-sidekick, Mr. Green. In his quest to nab the delinquent, Shredderman becomes a suspect, and clearing his name requires hiding in a smelly trash bag, riding his bike farther than ever before, and, of course, posting muckraking photos and articles on shredderman.com. The hullabaloo stirred up by relatively tame vandalism seems a bit unconvincing, and it's disappointing to see Nolan gaining more adult accomplices at book's end rather than allowing his alter ego's successes to carry over into his relationships with his peers. Not as stellar as Shredderman's first soaring leap into cyberspace, but still balm for all those dweeby kids who will see themselves in Nolan and cheer him on, as well as any middle-grader wanting something fast, funny, and technologically up-to-the-minute. ((Reviewed September 1, 2004)) Copyright 2004 Booklist Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Spring
Dweeby fifth-grader Nolan Byrd begins an investigation to discover who is spray-painting graffiti on teachers' cars in the school parking lot. In this fast-paced, funny story about kid power, Nolan--a.k.a. Shredderman--employs a disguise, a video camera, and his anonymous website to expose the culprit. Suitably arch black-and-white illustrations appear throughout this welcome follow-up to [cf2]Secret Identity[cf1]. Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Horn Book Guide Reviews 2005 Fall
The third and fourth books about an elementary school superhero who uses the Internet stretch credibility more than the first two. When Nolan, as "Shredderman," unmasks an unscrupulous tabloid reporter and a possible spy ring, local news agencies and even the FBI have trouble discovering his secret identity. Though these volumes will attract fans, Shredderman should have stuck to school problems. [Review covers these Shredderman titles: [cf2]Enemy Spy[cf1] and [cf2]Meet the Gecko[cf1].] Copyright 2005 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

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Kirkus Reviews 2004 July #2
Self-styled "cyber-superhero" Nolan Byrd once again wields digital camera and Web site in defense of truth, justice, and just deserts for bullies. Someone's painting silly faces all over town, and Nolan, thanks to some sharp observation and a conveniently overheard conversation, suspects that Bubba Bixby, the previous episode's bully-de-jour, knows who. So how to unmask the vandal, without revealing his own secret "Shredderman" identity? Like a younger Sammy Keyes, Nolan springs into action, "blasting" through doorways, "zooming" down streets, and working on a complicated plan to post a video of the baddie in action-all while springing through several running subplots, both at home and at school. Equipped with a genuinely juvenile sense of humor (but a clear sense of right and wrong, too), plus a serious addiction to exclamation points, this engagingly bright, complex fifth-grade sleuth will sweep readers into his newest jet-propelled adventure. (Illustrations not seen) (Fiction. 8-11) Copyright Kirkus 2004 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2006 May #3
Shredderman: Secret Identity; Attack of the Tagger Wendelin Van Draanen, illus. by Brian Biggs. Random/Yearling, $5.50 each ISBN 0-440-41912-3; 0-440-41913-1. PW said, "Van Draanen launches a one-man Revenge of the Nerds for the elementary crowd." Ages 7-10. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 2004 August #3
Shredderman: Attack of the Tagger by Wendelin Van Draanen, illus. by Brian Biggs, continues the adventures of Nolan Byrd (aka Shredderman) begun with Secret Identity, which PW called " `Revenge of the Nerds' for the elementary crowd." When someone vandalizes Nolan's favorite teacher's van, it's up to Shredderman and his digital camera to unmask the villain. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2005 July
Gr 3-7-In his fourth appearance, Nolan stumbles onto an international spy ring and sets off a chain reaction of suspicions that lead to the arrests of his parents and his teacher. To complicate things, his archenemy, Bubba, has discovered that Nolan is indeed Shredderman. But instead of exposing his secret, the bully wants one thing: to be Shredderman's sidekick, The Bouncer. In the end, Nolan must reveal his identity in order to save his family and his favorite teacher. As in the earlier books, the protagonist uses his Web site to help move justice along and make sure the truth is seen. Readers will identify with him and the other kids in the school and will start rooting for the underdogs. Reluctant readers will enjoy the fast-moving plot and the black-and-white cartoons scattered throughout. The book could also be used to teach awareness about bullying and tolerance of kids who are different.-Kim Carlson, Monticello High School, IA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 2004 November
Gr 3-6-Nolan's life has not been the same since he invented Shredderman. Sure, he's still called "nerd," and he avoids running into bully Bubba Bixby, but now he's secretly a cyber-hero. As such, Nolan knows he's the man for the job when graffiti is spray-painted around Cedar Valley and the culprit cannot be caught. However, things do not go as planned as Shredderman is accused of being the tagger, and he is under the clock to see that truth and justice prevail before his true identity comes to light. Van Draanen delivers an entertaining sequel to Secret Identity (Knopf, 2004), packed with plenty of action and humor to keep kids, especially reluctant readers, turning the pages and rooting for Nolan. As in the first book, Biggs's black-and-white illustrations capture the humor and action of the straightforward plot.-Christine McGinty, Albany Public Library, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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