Reviews for I Went Walking


Horn Book Guide Reviews 1996
The simplicity and repetition of the text and the simplicity and boldness of the illustration make this melodious guessing-game concept book (in which a young child goes for a walk and collects a procession of colorful animals), work perfectly in board-book format. A first-class production. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1992 June #3
Out for a stroll, a girl sees a variety of creatures--rendered in Vivas's distinctive, whimsical style--``looking at me.'' Ages 3-7. (Aug.) Copyright 1992 Cahners Business Information.

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Publishers Weekly Reviews 1990 August #5
This Australian import presents a repetitive rhyme that will be appreciated most by the very young. A boy takes a walk and encounters a variety of animals: ``I went walking / What did I see? / I saw a black cat / Looking at me.'' The cat follows him, as do all of the other animals he meets: a brown horse, a red cow, a green duck, a pink pig and a yellow dog. Finally the child is leading a veritable parade of animals. Although Williams's text is not particularly imaginative, the book receives spark from Vivas's illustrations. Each time the question is posed, she offers a partial glimpse of the animal, which is not shown in its entirety until the following page. Thus the story becomes a kind of guessing game that little ones will enjoy playing again and again. Ages 3-7. (Sept.) Copyright 1990 Cahners Business Information.

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School Library Journal Reviews 1990 October
A worthy successor to Bill Martin's Brown Bear, Brown Bear , What Do You See? (Holt, 1983). With its patterned response to the title, ``What did you see?,'' and the accompanying lead-in picture showing part of a farmyard animal, this book immediately draws children into the story. The lively, unspoken storyline of a shock-headed toddler playing silly games with the animals he meets and gradually shedding his shoes, socks, and jacket fills out the spare text for beginning readers. The accumulating line of animals marching in wild sweeping patterns across the page gives viewers a bouncy, flowing experience from page to page. With only six animals, the story is brief; the watercolors, while predominantly realistic in tone and anatomical detail, have an exaggerated roundness and glow that give a fanciful turn to the naming story. The animals and toddler become progressively more animated, until story's end, which features a two-page, wordless spread reminiscent of Max's ``wild rumpus'' in Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are . The focus on the pages is clearly on the short text and the characters, making for a simple yet active experience for beginning readers and very young listeners. --Ruth K. MacDonald, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN Copyright 1990 Cahners Business Information.

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